Consider the following before you decide to accept your employers' counter-offer:

Your employer offers an increase in salary to counter an offer made by a competing firm. Many employees will entertain, and a few will accept the (counter) offer. Those that accept a counter-offer often do so because they will not have to address the emotions of leaving their "comfort zone" (current employer), and entering into the unknown of joining a new company. But, what are the dangers of accepting a counter-offer? 

1.

In the mind of your manager (employer), it is never a good time for you to resign. "I'm short-handed, I'll miss my vacation, it affects the morale of the (my) department, this makes me look bad to my boss", etc. Your manager (employer) needs to buy time to find your replacement.

2.

Why did you have to resign in order to get a raise? If you are worth the counter-offer dollars now, why didn't you receive an increase in pay before now? Did you have to blackmail your manager into getting a raise?

3.

Your annual review is coming up in a few months. Are you just getting an increase in your pay early?

4.

In your manager's (employer's) mind, you are no longer a loyal employee. No longer within that "inner circle" as a trusted employee. Often, as soon as your manager (employer) finds a replacement for you, adios! Or, perhaps you may be passed up for the next promotion.

Statistics show that if you accept a counter offer, the probability of voluntarily leaving in six months or of being let go within one year is extremely high. Statistics compiled by the National Employment Association, confirm that over 80% of those who accept a counter-offer are no longer with the same company six months later.

Accepting a counter-offer can influence the decision of a future employer from making you an offer to join their company. In effect you may have "blackballed" yourself.

Remember the reasons you had for making a career change. Sure, part of it may be compensation. However, there were probably other motivating factors such as, upward mobility, challenge, geographic location, and so on.

Once you have made the decision to make a change in your career path, make a plan, follow your plan, and stick to it. Don't allow yourself to be "futured" into staying with your current employer. It is not worth the risk.

 

 

 

 

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